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Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Zaire, 1976

November 7, 2014

ebola_virus_1976

The origins of Ebola are linked to a deadly Malaria vaccine formula called ‘Chloroquine’ – which affected only those individuals locally who received the Malaria treatment; while also virally shedding to others in the community who had close contact with the infected (host) vaccinee. In all cases, The typical onset of symptoms leading to Hemorrhagic Fever (what was eventually diagnosed as Ebola) began to manifest within 5 days after receiving the toxic shot.

‘Between 1 September and 24 October 1976, 318 cases of acute viral haemorrhagic fever occurred in northern Zaire. The outbreak was centred in the Bumba Zone of the Equateur Region and most of the cases were recorded within a radius of 70 km of Yambuku, although a few patients sought medical attention in Bumba, Abumombazi, and the capital city of Kinshasa, where individual secondary and tertiary cases occurred. There were 280 deaths, and only 38 serologically confirmed survivors.

The index (first reported) case in this outbreak had onset of symptoms on 1 September 1976, five days after receiving an injection of chloroquine for presumptive malaria at the outpatient clinic at Yambuku Mission Hospital (YMH). He had a clinical remission of his malaria symptoms.

Within one week several other persons who had received injections at YMH also suffered from Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and almost all subsequent cases had either received injections at the hospital or had had close contact with another case. Most of these occurred during the first four weeks of the epidemic, after which time the hospital was closed, 11 of the 17 staff members having died of the disease.

All ages and both sexes were affected, but women 15-29 years of age had the highest incidence of disease, a phenomenon strongly related to attendance at prenatal and outpatient clinics at the hospital where they received injections. The overall secondary attack rate was about 5%, although it ranged to 20% among close relatives such as spouses, parent or child, and brother or sister.‘ Report of an International Commission, World Health Organization, 1978

1. ‘The index (first reported) case in this outbreak had onset of symptoms on 1 September 1976, five days after receiving an injection of chloroquine for presumptive malaria ‘

2. ‘Within one week several other persons who had received injections at YMH also suffered from Ebola haemorrhagic fever.’

3. ‘almost all subsequent cases had either received injections at the hospital or had had close contact (vaccine-derived viral shedding) with another case.’

Note to those Doctors & Virologists unaware of this crucial information: Chloroquine (treatment for Malaria) was indeed INJECTED into those Africans who subsequently contracted Ebola (typical symptoms manifesting within 5-7 days). It has since been given strictly in a pill form. However in 1976, in Zaire, Africa, safety protocols were unavailable or ignored – with dire consequences.

 

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